Month: January 2018

Learning and Long-term Memory

Most traditional models of memory contain only two stages of memory, short-term and long-term memory. When it comes to learning, I would propose a third type of memory that has a very large capacity but has an intermediate length of time that lasts longer…

Action Research Examined

Action research in education currently makes up the bulk of the published research into instructional strategies evaluating classroom performance. Action research is research that is conducted within a classroom followed by an analysis that is performed comparing the strategies used. Action research forms the…

Critical Thinking, Critical Analysis, and Critique – Same or Different?

Unfortunately, for many naïve teachers and students, these three things are thought of as the same thing. They are not. They are two different things (two of these things are closely related – one of these things just doesn’t belong). I can’t tell you…

The Science of Learning – Why I do It

The Science of Learning is the application of the research into how people learn to teach. There are years and years, even more than a century in some cases, of solid empirical research into learning to draw on. The established theory, not hypothetical theory,…

How We Believe

How do we find out what we believe in, or what are the methods that we have of knowing? According to Peirce (1877), there are four methods of knowing information, method of authority, method of tenacity, a priori method, and the scientific method. I will review each one of them, and consider how…

The Science of Learning – Teachers

There are a number of new readers who aren’t really familiar with The Science of Learning and what it is. Here is a short piece to clarify what it is and where it comes from. The Science of Learning is about teachers. It isn’t…

Tomorrow’s Learning: Business or Education Driven

Traditional higher education institutions are attended by millions of students. The students work hard for a few years and exit with some kind of qualification. For the most part, these institutions rely on traditional teaching methods: 80% straight lectures, 12% enhanced lectures (lectures plus…

The Science (Opinion) of Learning

On a number of occasions, I have written about the scientific principles underlying The Science of Learning. Scientific principles based on decades, stretching to a century and a half, of empirical research. Robust empirical research into how people think, how memory works, what motivates…

Hidden Costs of Today’s Education

Education costs money. We all know that. However, are there other costs that we tend to ignore? Are there costs at individual and societal levels that we don’t want to know about? I believe that there are. Conformity is a hallmark of education. I…

Why Enlightenment in Higher Education

When the enlightenment occurred a couple of centuries ago, rational thinking and the scientific method slowly emerged as a way to understand the world. Thousands of scientists and their scientific inquiries arose. A rigorous debate about these scientific findings began, based on the rules…

Higher Order Thinking and Leadership

There has been much written about leadership and leaders, but what about the interaction between higher order thinking and leadership. If we want to cultivate good leadership, we need to understand what role higher order thinking plays. First, let me remind you about the…

Creating the New Ideas

I have written much recently about higher order thinking skills and the failure of higher education to teach the masses of students that emerge from our institutions with little or no evidence that we have succeeded. All we teach is stuff, cramming and passing…